Site Meter ANCORA IMPARO
I believe in simplicity. I believe in feelings and family, friendship and fidelity, forgiveness and fortitude. I believe in miracles, meditation, motherhood and make believe and that music is the only real magic this world has ever seen. I believe in concocting and consuming colorful cocktails and fussing over and feasting on fabulous food. I believe in living out loud. I believe in laughing until your face hurts and loving until your heart breaks. I believe in behaving boldly and when warranted, badly, taking bubble baths and being barefoot. I believe in poetry, puppies and playing in the park. I believe in seeking without ceasing that which sings to my soul and strengthens my spirit. I believe in dancing in the rain and digging in the dirt. I believe in honest expression and the golden rule. I believe in Nature and naps and that naïveté is sometimes necessary. I believe in goodness and gratitude, grit and grace. I believe in unity and the power of the universe. I believe in being authentically awesome. I believe in being better today than yesterday but not as good as tomorrow. I believe in challenges and change and growing pains. I believe in the inherent worth of every creature, being and life force on this planet. I believe in honoring the individual journeys and paths of people whether I understand them or not. I believe in letting people live their truth and trusting that it’s right for them. I believe in lifting up and letting go. I believe that death is just as sacred an experience as birth and that it is never, ever an end.

Mostly, I just believe that I’m never going to stop learning what it is I believe.


Read the Printed Word!



Might’ve let my daughter’s first time driving be behind the wheel of the new car I bought today.  (at Lake Massena)

Might’ve let my daughter’s first time driving be behind the wheel of the new car I bought today. (at Lake Massena)

natgeofound:

A farmer embraces his dog in his stonewalled field on Inishmore Island in Ireland, March 1971.Photograph by Winfield Parks, National Geographic Creative

This beautifully captures the feeling that I had when we visited this very place last month. 
Pure innocent bliss.
Must go back soon.

natgeofound:

A farmer embraces his dog in his stonewalled field on Inishmore Island in Ireland, March 1971.Photograph by Winfield Parks, National Geographic Creative

This beautifully captures the feeling that I had when we visited this very place last month.

Pure innocent bliss.

Must go back soon.

nprfreshair:

Today we’re playing an excerpt of Terry’s interview with Elaine Stritch, a performer lucky enough to have debuted songs by Noel Coward and Stephen Sondheim, and to have been coached by each of them.  She died last Thursday at the age of 89. 
Stritch used to describe herself as “a Catholic, diabetic, alcoholic, pain in the ass.”  Her Broadway career began in 1946.  She was Ethel Merman’s understudy in the Irving Berlin musical Call Me Madam in the early 50s, and starred in Noel Coward’s 1961 Broadway musical Sail Away, in a role that he expanded to suit her large talent.   In 1970 she co-starred in the Sondheim musical Company, where she sang what became one of her signature songs, The Ladies Who Lunch.  In 2002, she was on Broadway in her autobiographical one woman show Elaine Stritch At Liberty.   In 2010, she replaced Angela Lansbury in a revival of Sondheim’s Follies.  TV audiences knew her from 30 Rock playing Alec Baldwin’s mother. 
Terry spoke with Stritch in 1999, when she was starring in a revival of Sail Away, in honor of Noel Coward’s centennial. 

nprfreshair:

Today we’re playing an excerpt of Terry’s interview with Elaine Stritch, a performer lucky enough to have debuted songs by Noel Coward and Stephen Sondheim, and to have been coached by each of them.  She died last Thursday at the age of 89. 

Stritch used to describe herself as “a Catholic, diabetic, alcoholic, pain in the ass.”  Her Broadway career began in 1946.  She was Ethel Merman’s understudy in the Irving Berlin musical Call Me Madam in the early 50s, and starred in Noel Coward’s 1961 Broadway musical Sail Away, in a role that he expanded to suit her large talent.   In 1970 she co-starred in the Sondheim musical Company, where she sang what became one of her signature songs, The Ladies Who Lunch.  In 2002, she was on Broadway in her autobiographical one woman show Elaine Stritch At Liberty.   In 2010, she replaced Angela Lansbury in a revival of Sondheim’s Follies.  TV audiences knew her from 30 Rock playing Alec Baldwin’s mother. 

Terry spoke with Stritch in 1999, when she was starring in a revival of Sail Away, in honor of Noel Coward’s centennial. 

“May our effort, confidence and concern for others be the altar from which we pray for personal abundance.”

—Laura Teresa Marquez

“There is a lie that acts like a virus within the mind of humanity. And that lie is, ‘There’s not enough good to go around. There’s lack and there’s limitation and there’s just not enough.’ The truth is that there’s more than enough good to go around. There is more than enough creative ideas. There is more than enough power. There is more than enough love. There’s more than enough joy. All of this begins to come through a mind that is aware of its own infinite nature. There is enough for everyone. If you believe it, if you can see it, if you act from it, it will show up for you. That’s the truth.”

—Michael Beckwith

“Zach Braff’s most vaunted position in pop culture circa 2014 isn’t as the actor who played the annoying guy on the TV show your college roommates watched all the time, or as a fervent Redditor who once assisted in helping someone propose to their girlfriend online, or as a distant blood relative to Mitt Romney. Arguably, he’s not even most known as the guy who directed Garden State—he’s the guy who put together the Garden State soundtrack, and so the question surrounding Wish I Was Here is a strange one that most films aren’t subject to: What does it sound like?”

Larry Fitzmaurice reviews the soundtrack to Zach Braff’s Garden State follow-up, Wish I Was Here. (via pitchfork)

Having heard it, I can vouch that it’s every bit as wonderful as Garden State PLUS some. It’s a beautifully crafted effort from him. I won’t put him in a league with Cameron Crowe by any means because that’s the pinnacle of soundtrack mastery and he is the end all, be all for me but Braff’s definitely got a gift for it.

846 plays

Andrew McMahon In The Wilderness

Cecilia and the Satellite

for all the things my hands have held, the best by far is you

(Source: anditslove)

Search
Navigate
Archive

Text, photographs, quotes, links, conversations, audio and visual material preserved for future reference.