Site Meter ANCORA IMPARO
I believe in simplicity. I believe in feelings and family, friendship and fidelity, forgiveness and fortitude. I believe in miracles, meditation, motherhood and make believe and that music is the only real magic this world has ever seen. I believe in concocting and consuming colorful cocktails and fussing over and feasting on fabulous food. I believe in living out loud. I believe in laughing until your face hurts and loving until your heart breaks. I believe in behaving boldly and when warranted, badly, taking bubble baths and being barefoot. I believe in poetry, puppies and playing in the park. I believe in seeking without ceasing that which sings to my soul and strengthens my spirit. I believe in dancing in the rain and digging in the dirt. I believe in honest expression and the golden rule. I believe in Nature and naps and that naïveté is sometimes necessary. I believe in goodness and gratitude, grit and grace. I believe in unity and the power of the universe. I believe in being authentically awesome. I believe in being better today than yesterday but not as good as tomorrow. I believe in challenges and change and growing pains. I believe in the inherent worth of every creature, being and life force on this planet. I believe in honoring the individual journeys and paths of people whether I understand them or not. I believe in letting people live their truth and trusting that it’s right for them. I believe in lifting up and letting go. I believe that death is just as sacred an experience as birth and that it is never, ever an end.

Mostly, I just believe that I’m never going to stop learning what it is I believe.


Read the Printed Word!



10 plays

Fleet Foxes

Montezuma
Helplessness Blues

Fleet Foxes - “Montezuma”

Oh how could I dream of such a selfless and true love
could I wash my hands of
just looking out for me?

Oh man what I used to be
Oh man oh my oh me
Oh man what I used to be
Oh man oh my oh me

Enjoying a great conversation with the summer wind blowing between us, a full moon shining above, lightly peeking through the tree branches and this song gently singing in the background tonight was pure bliss.

Pure.

Bliss.

Every day a surprise. :) (Taken with Instagram at Grant’s Growing Garden)

Every day a surprise. :) (Taken with Instagram at Grant’s Growing Garden)

“The great majority of us are required to live a life of constant duplicity. Your health is bound to be affected if, day after day, you say the opposite of what you feel, if you grovel before what you dislike, and rejoice at what brings you nothing but misfortune.”

—Boris Pasternak

Independent Lens: Two Spirits

Two Spirits interweaves the tragic story of a mother’s loss of her son with a revealing look at the largely unknown history of a time when the world wasn’t simply divided into male and female and many Native American cultures held places of honor for people of integrated genders.

Fred Martinez was nádleehí, a male-bodied person with a feminine nature, a special gift according to his ancient Navajo culture. He was one of the youngest hate-crime victims in modern history when he was brutally murdered at 16. Two Spirits explores the life and death of this boy who was also a girl, and the essentially spiritual nature of gender.

Two Spirits tells compelling stories about traditions that were once widespread among the indigenous cultures of North America. The film explores the contemporary lives and history of Native two-spirit people — who combine the traits of both men and women with qualities that are also unique to individuals who express multiple genders.

The Navajo believe that to maintain harmony, there must be a balanced interrelationship between the feminine and the masculine within the individual, in families, in the culture, and in the natural world. Two Spirits reveals how these beliefs are expressed in a natural range of gender diversity. For the first time on film, it examines the Navajo concept of nádleehí, “one who constantly transforms.”

In Navajo culture, there are four genders; some indigenous cultures recognize more. Native activists working to renew their cultural heritage adopted the English term “two-spirit” as a useful shorthand to describe the entire spectrum of gender and sexual expression that is better and more completely described in their own languages. The film demonstrates how they are revitalizing two-spirit traditions and once again claiming their rightful place within their tribal communities.

Two Spirits mourns the young Fred Martinez and the threatened disappearance of the two-spirit tradition, but it also brims with hope and the belief that we all are enriched by multi-gendered people, and that all of us — regardless of ethnicity, gender, sexuality, or cultural heritage — benefit from being free to be our truest selves.

“Adversity is like a strong wind. It tears away from us all but the things that cannot be torn, so that we see ourselves as we really are.”

—Arthur Golden

“Be what you are. This is the first step toward becoming better than you are.”

—Julius Charles Hare

“The most powerful thing you can do to change the world is to change your own beliefs about the nature of life, people, and reality to something more positive and begin to act accordingly.”

—Shakti Gawain

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